Archives for posts with tag: goals

I was fortunate, recently, to be able to travel to Guernsey, working with Aurigny Airline. My involvement was to join the back-end of a five day Train the Trainer workshop, hosted by a good friend of mine, Fleur Johnson, from Insight Solutions Consulting Group.  It was the first time in Guernsey for me, and I got to experience the short flight from London Gatwick in the ATR aircraft, a great deal smaller than the aircraft I would normally take from Gatwick!

Gatwick South Terminal, busy people, off to different parts of the world, all with their own agenda.

Gatwick South Terminal, busy people, off to different parts of the world, all with their own agenda.

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Passengers embarking on the Aurigny Airline ATR, from Gatwick South

Following a pleasant crossing, slightly delayed, due to a fog-bound Guernsey I arrived and without further delay met the team we were working with.  Of course, having worked with the group for three days already, they had bonded well and I was interested to find out how they would react to a ‘new’ member joining the team.  Whilst I was there to deliver parts of the workshop and undertake feedback sessions on the final day, as always, I was determined to further my knowledge of the airline industry (having worked with different airlines for over 15 years).  Remember, we are always learning no matter how much we think we already know.

So what did I learn?  A Top Six Learning Points from my time in Guernsey (in no particular order)!

  1. How much does an aircraft weigh? Got that? Now, add on a load of passengers (of varying weights), luggage, crew, food and drink, fuel… and anything else you care to add… because we need to know this, in order that the aircraft is ‘light’ enough to effect a take-off.. AND… to land safely.  How many of us would even consider this, when we are queuing at the airport, on our return from holiday.. with those little extra’s in our suitcase.  Such is this calculation, that if the aircraft is painted as part of its maintenance, then that has to be noted also!  When you think about it, thats a colossal additional weight.  Consider how much paint would be needed to re-paint an aircraft (bearing in mind, the original coats are still on the plane) and then consider how much a can of paint actually weighs when you collect it from your local DIY store! Thanks Travis, for always getting the calculation right!
  2. What happens if you are on a flight and you become ill?  Not just unwell, but something serious, such as a heart attack?  Defibrillation equipment is carried on all of these flights together with trained staff… but how’s this for a few facts:- In Europe, every 45 seconds, a cardiac arrest takes place.  That sounds like an awful lot of people, but relate it to how many people are in Europe.  With intervention, early resuscitation and prompt defibrillation, within 1-2 minutes, a greater than 60% survival rate can be achieved.  Thanks Monika for raising our awareness and making us feel a lot safer.
  3. Ever considered what requirements certain passengers need on an aircraft?  Just how do you get a wheelchair user along the aisle of a plane?  What about a deaf or blind person, either looking or listening out for departure/boarding times?  Thankfully, there are procedures in place to assist with this, so thanks Martyn, for the enlightening training session!  Things we perhaps ‘know’ but never put into practice, because we never come across that scenario on a regular basis.  It was a pleasure to be able to use my acting skills for your session! 🙂
  4. It’s always important to have all bases covered and I’m always impressed by the amount of safety procedures we have, but I have to admit, knowing how much Oxygen is stored on a plane, even a relatively small passenger plane, such as the ATR or the Embraer Jet, in emergencies or times of decompression makes us all feel comfortable.  As we know, safety is paramount and I’ll confess to always watching and listening to the safety instructions from the flight crew, regardless of how many times i’ve seen it.  Thanks Faye, for your training session, together with some new phrases I learnt!
  5. Ever wondered, when you’re sitting on the plane, ready for take-off… what those guys and girls are doing, walking around the plane in their Hi-Viz jackets?  Well again, they are there for your safety, making sure there is no damage, ensuring everything is in order and carrying out a procedure that most of us take for granted.  Who’s in control of the plane during this time? Well most would say ‘The Pilot’, but it is in fact the ground crew, standing on the terra firma, during the ‘pushback’ procedure… once the plane is then ready to taxi to the runway.. The Pilot takes control.  Thanks Rob for passing on your knowledge and you’re right… you wear the Hi-Viz well!
  6. Finally, again on the theme of safety, how important is it that EVERYONE carries out their job, to the best of their ability and leaving nothing to chance?  Mike took us on a journey around the world, in particular the middle east, and highlighted the National Air Cargo’s Boeing 747-400 freighter crash in Afghanistan, that many will have seen on You Tube and rather than jumping to conclusions that because it was in Afghanistan, it was the subject of terrorist activity or military intervention.. the most probable cause was that a heavy item of cargo was not secured properly, thus becoming unstable.  For want of a simple procedure, the crew lost their lives.  What a responsibility… but this of course is not just limited to the aviation industry.

So you see, even though I was in Guernsey ‘training’, as always it’s a joy to increase my own knowledge.  Basic, little things, that we take for granted, or, more realistically, don’t even think about as they possibly may never affect us, directly… (until something goes wrong)!

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Gary Boyes & Fleur Johnson from Insight Solutions Training Group, Quayside in St. Peter Port

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St. Peter Port Harbour as the sun starts to fade.

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St. Peter Port Harbour as the sun starts to fade.

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You really can’t go to St. Peter Port, Guernsey, without sampling the Surf & Turf in ‘Mora’! Fillet Steak and Lobster.. Luscious!

You never know, what you don’t know… just think about that for a while.

Put this into the real world situation, of everyone’s busy schedules and whilst you’re undertaking your chores and work, why not glean some additional knowledge.  You’ll never know when you may possibly need it?  The late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple attended Caligraphy lessons, just because he found it interesting… but of course, never needed it in his life.  A good few years later, when the initial font-types on computers were being thought over, there was Jobs, with his knowledge of different styles.  He refers to it as ‘joining the dots’, but you can only join the dots looking back, not forward.

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The sun shines on the tail fin as we leave Guernsey. Great place, great people and I look forward to returning in the very near future. Work days like these, never seem to be ‘work’ 🙂

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I took an ATR on the way to Guernsey and had the pleasure of returning to the mainland in the newest member of the fleet, The Embraer. Here’s the view, heading due North North East 🙂

For more information and workshops that will be useful to your life, simply drop us a line.

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The ROLIS instrument took a snapshot of comet 67P/CG as Europe’s Philae lander descended toward the surface on Nov. 12, 2014.
Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS/DLR

So has anyone else been captivated by the recent events concerning the Rosetta Space Mission? I mean, just consider that the launch date goes as far back as March 2004, when a certain Mr Peter Andre was number one in the charts with ‘Mysterious Girl’! What was the point of the mission? To rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and undertake a lengthy exploration of a comet at close quarters to watch how it is transformed by the warmth of the Sun along its elliptical orbit.

Now, when you take into account, the journey to the comet alone would take over 10 years, that the mission was ‘put into hibernation’ to conserve energy and would be ‘woken’ at an arranged date when it moved closer to the sun and was warmed by the suns rays, that the comet was 317 MILLION Miles from earth and that the comet is travelling at 34,000 mph… to land a ‘washing machine’ sized probe (Philae Probe) is truly AMAZING! Already data has been sent back, including pictures which will give mankind even more information about our solar system. A comparison has been made that it was like a fly landing on a fired bullet!

Some will say… what is the point (when you consider that the mission has cost over $1 billion, but then, you can always argue… what is the point of anything, people will always have opinions and opinions are what makes the world go round! Whether you agree with the mission or not, you cannot fail to be impressed with the vision.  I mean… who would have ever dreamt up the fact of landing a probe on a speeding comet? (Well, we can all dream), yet who would have this dream/vision but actually have the commitment to see the mission through?

Too often, I, and no doubt you, hear that ‘This is impossible’ or ‘That is impossible’… and once the words have been said (even if this is in our minds, talking to ourselves) it gives us the right to give up.

If you are that determined, then this mission alone should give you all the motivation that you need to discover, whatever life may throw at you, that there is normally a way.  It may not happen instantly, it may take years of planning and there will doubtless be risks and potential problems involved.  Even after all the meticulous planning in the world, it is very possible that the outcome was not what was originally visioned, (as in the case of the Philae Probe, where it appears that the landing on the comet has left the probe in a crater’s shadow thus not allowing the sun to recharge the solar panels.  It is currently in ‘hibernation’ and will await recharging, when and if, the probe can absorb some sun energy).

Next time you have a dream, and people tell you it’s impossible… give them the Rosetta Space Mission Story!…. Just like the Philae Probe…To be continued!

Richard Branson Opportunity.001

How many business opportunities are turned down on a regular basis (and life opportunities), purely because we lack the confidence to carry it out or doubt ourselves that we have sufficient knowledge or skill to undertake the task? Take the opportunity and use it as a motivator, to learn a new skill or increase your knowledge. Can you imagine how impactful that could be?

Next time an opportunity presents itself, grab it with both hands… and then go about increasing your knowledge or skill. Consider what resources you may need?

If this is something that you’d like to investigate further, then be sure to watch out for our forthcoming workshop, where the focus will be on making you a far more confident person than, perhaps, you are at the present time.

Contact us on 01277 821651 or simply email us on info@imduk.com to register your interest.

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Phil Mickelson, the pro-golfer from the States, recently won The Open, held at Muirfield, Scotland. Mickelson has won many tournaments during his professional career, including three Masters and a USPGA Championship, yet, even after twenty attempts had never won The Open title, in fact up until this year had never won on British Soil! Without doubt he has one of the best short-games in golf, yet playing on a links course, as befits The Open Championship he seemed to struggle.
Now, he had two choices, either accept that whilst he had mastered the game in the States an Open Championship would always allude him… or… change his strategy and tactics, practice hard and have the belief in himself and his game to win on a links-style course.
The rest is history, for not only did he put in hours of practice on courses similar to where Open Championships are held, he made the journey to Scotland the week before and won, after a play-off, The Scottish Open. Perhaps buoyed by this inaugural win on UK soil, exactly a week later he was lifting the Claret Jug, his name written in history.
Sometimes the final piece of the jigsaw is to have that belief that one day, when all the factors are in place, you have put in the preparation, then the prize is yours?

Never ever underestimate the power of the mind! How many attempts do you give something before giving up? It took Phil twenty years to achieve his target, how long will yours take?

On a recent Golf day, albeit not as grand as The Open, I had a pretty average front 9 holes, nothing spectacular, and to be honest going through the motions. The back 9 started, to say the least, pretty average again, bogeying (1 over par) the 10th hole before sinking an 8 foot putt for birdie (one under par) at the Par 3 11th. Sometimes you need that little piece of ‘lady luck’ to kick-start what you are doing and I confidently strode onto the 12th Tee before dispatching my drive down the fairway. A wedge to the green left a 20 foot putt that I carefully lined up… and sunk! Two birdies, back-to-back… I was on a roll! Next came a Par five and having found the green in two I narrowly missed the Eagle putt (2 under par) but tapped-in for birdie. The 14th hole, a par 4 was long, but downhill and having driven the centre of the fairway my second shot was pulled to the left. My playing partner commented at the time, ‘That’s a shame, you’ve spoiled your sequence’ to which I replied, ‘Don’t worry, I’ll chip it in’. Yes, you’ve guessed it, with a sand wedge in hand, from about 32 feet away, the ball sailed over the bunker, bounced a couple of times on the green before running up to the hole and dropping in the cup! Birdie number 4!! How long could this run continue? At the 15th, another par 4 I was 5 foot from the pin in two, and confidently stroked the putt home (I was beginning to rue the sloppy 3 putt on the par 5 tenth now)! Holes 16, 17 and 18 were uneventful… but were all played in level par, in fact I missed a 6 footer for birdie at the last, but wow, what a round of golf! Take your opportunities when you have them, and keep believing!

If you would like to know more about accessing your own power, then contact us at IMD (UK) Limited on 01277 821651 or simply email us power@imduk.com

Here’s a message from Woody and Buzz, stars of Toy Story.

The imagination of children is a wonderful thing, they have that ability to become flexible with their thoughts and adapt their belief systems, yet many of us lose this as we have to ‘conform’ or ‘fit in’ to some of the various guidelines and boxes that again, (strangely) we imagine are there! This Christmas, use some of that imagination and create your own future… it really is that easy. Pablo Picasso once said, ‘Everything you can imagine is real’ and we can most certainly relate to this, when we consider how effective the most simple toys were when we were much younger. Who honestly never imagined they were Prince Charming or a Disney Princess when they were at primary school when becoming a Premier League Footballer or a TV Presenter or Actress was quite simply a reality and something you would ‘just do’ when you grew up rather than how many people see it now, a ‘pipe dream’? How many knock-backs do we receive along the way, possibly, which has the conditioning effect that we are simply just not good enough or the best jobs are ‘for those other, lucky, people’?

Lose those limiting belief systems and go and change your world. For help with this, simply follow our blog http://www.imduk.org or facebook page http://www.facebook.com/IMDUKlimited and start yourself on the road to your destination, whatever you imagine that may be?